SteriTouch has launched disposable mobile phone sleeves aimed at improving infection control in hospitals.

The sleeves are manufactured from durable polyethylene with in-built antimicrobial protection, which reduces the growth of harmful bacteria such as MRSA and E.Coli. They are fully disposable and recyclable, yet robust enough to withstand heavy use.

Many studies have shown that our mobile phone touchscreens are dirtier than a public toilet seat, so it’s easy to see why they are regarded as a contamination hotspot in high-risk areas such as hospitals. Despite many hospitals having a ‘no phones on duty’ rule for staff, the fact remains that this is often ignored, and this is where antimicrobial phone sleeves can bridge the gap.

While the sleeves were designed for frontline hospital workers, they are also a useful option for visitors and any other workers in a hygiene sensitive environment, who can continue to use their mobile phones without the risk of cross contamination.

Perhaps the most important feature of the sleeves is that whilst in use, touchscreen phones will still retain all functionality.  Devices can be used as normal, while also protecting vulnerable patients.

​SteriTouch antimicrobial sleeves were developed using LDPE material, with an antimicrobial, non-migratory silver additive that lasts for the life of the film. The antimicrobial protection begins fighting harmful microbes within minutes of contact. Independently tested to the international standard, the sleeves demonstrate a 99.99% reduction in harmful microbes within 24 hours, including MRSA and E.Coli.

Hospital acquired infections cost the NHS millions of pounds every year, and mobile phone sleeves are an easy and cost effective way to prevent the spread of infections. They are used in hospitals around the country, and can also be used by doctors, dentists, and other medical professionals that want to prevent bacterial build up on their technology and cut the risk of cross contamination.

SteriTouch antimicrobial mobile phone sleeves will be launched at the Infection Prevention Society conference in Exeter later this month.

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